GLJ Online

Reply to Professor Rothstein

In response to: Response Essay: Some Observations on Professor Schwartz’s “Foundation” Theory of Evidence by Paul Rothstein It is an honor and a privilege, both to have garnered Professor Rothstein’s careful and sympathetic reading of my article A Foundation Theory of Evidence (hereinafter “Foundation Theory”) and to have the opportunity to respond to his thought-provoking comments [...]

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Response Essay: Some Observations on Professor Schwartz’s “Foundation” Theory of Evidence

Professor David Schwartz’s A Foundation Theory of Evidence posits an intriguing new way to look at Evidence. It asserts that offered evidence must meet a tripartite requirement before it can be relevant. The tripartite requirement is that the evidence must be “case-specific, assertive, and probably true.” His shorthand for the tripartite requirement is that evidence [...]

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Another Bite at the Graham Cracker: The Supreme Court’s Surprise Revisiting of Juvenile Life Without Parole in Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs

The Supreme Court’s decision this week to review the constitutionality of life-without-parole sentences imposed upon individuals convicted of homicide crimes committed at age fourteen and younger in Miller v. Alabama and Jackson v. Hobbs stunned sentencing law advocates and Court watchers, myself included. This commentary will contextualize these two grants of certiorari within the Court’s [...]

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Response Essay: Temporal Variance, Hockey, and the Wartime Constitution

In “Let ‘Em Play”: A Study in the Jurisprudence of Sport, Professor Mitchell Berman offers a thoughtful and engaging defense of the concept of temporal variance, the notion that “some rules of some sports should be enforced less strictly toward the end of close matches.”   In support of his position, Professor Berman draws on various [...]

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Welcome to The Georgetown Law Journal Online

Welcome to The Georgetown Law Journal Online, the blog and online companion to The Georgetown Law Journal. The Georgetown Law Journal Online, like the Journal, is a general legal publication that contains more informal blog posts as well as formal responses to in-print scholarship, scholarly debates, and case comments. The launch of The Georgetown Law Journal Online coincides [...]

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The Internet Changed Everything, Even the Law

“The Internet changes everything,” they told us in the mid-90s. But what about law? Has the Internet changed it too? Certainly, it has changed forever how legal research is done. In the United States, digital filing has changed the lives of associates and paralegals everywhere, making it necessary for law firms to learn about metadata and proper redaction techniques, [...]

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Journal Unbound

At last year’s Symposium in Celebration of Justice John Paul Stevens, sponsored by the Georgetown Law Journal, the recently retired jurist informed me that he knew my work.  I was in my final semester at Georgetown, not a member of the Journal, and never once published—nor intended to publish—a student note in any law review.  [...]

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Innocence and the Internet

To help inaugurate Ipsa Loquitur, I’ve been asked to write a bit about the law, the Internet, and my job as a criminal justice reporter. I suppose I’ll start by telling you about the Internet’s role in what are probably the two biggest stories of my career. The first is the story of Cory Maye, [...]

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Standing in the Way of the Internet Revolution

The Internet has transformed news coverage of and commentary about the judiciary—up to and including the Supreme Court—but the transformation is incomplete. The Supreme Court and the Federal Judiciary still resist the technological innovations that could give Americans front-row seats, in their living rooms or at their computer desks, to watch the court system in [...]

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