Volume 102 - Issue 2 Georgetown Law Journal

After Newtown: Reconsidering Kelley v. R.G. Industries and the Radical Idea of Product-Category Liability for Manufacturers of Unreasonably Dangerous Firearms

Part I of this paper explores the background of the Kelley case and the circumstances that led the Maryland Court of Appeals to lash out against the powerful gun industry. Part II examines criticisms aimed at the Kelley opinion and identifies good arguments that the court exhibited sound legal judgment in a controversy that it […]

Read More :: View PDF

Constitutional Shari’a: Authoritarian Experiments with Islamic Judicial Review in Egypt, Iran, and Saudi Arabia

This Note is an investigation of Islamic judicial review—or the role courts play in evaluating legislation for compliance with constitutionally enshrined shari’a guarantees15—in Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Egypt. Although by no means an entirely representative grouping of Middle Eastern states, these three states are among the largest and most influential in the region and together […]

Read More :: View PDF

Protecting Children’s Rights Inside of the Schoolhouse Gates: Ending Corporal Punishment in Schools

Part I of this Note analyzes corporal punishment in the constitutional arena. Section A discusses Ingraham and section B covers the constitutional aftermath of the decision. Section B specifically explains how claims against corporal punishment in schools have been raised under the Fourth and Fourteenth Amendments, with circuit courts split regarding the applicability of these […]

Read More :: View PDF

Lawyers and Fools: Lawyer-Directors in Public Corprorations

The accepted wisdom—that a lawyer who becomes a corporate director has a fool for a client—is outdated. The benefits of lawyer-directors in today’s world significantly outweigh the costs. Beyond monitoring, they help manage litigation and regulation, as well as structure compensation to align CEO and shareholder interests. The results have been an average 9.5% increase […]

Read More :: View PDF

The Extra-legislative Veto

Presidents check statutory mandates outside the legislative process in a variety of ways. They may hold up implementation of a law, decide not to enforce a law, or decline to defend a law, to name just a few. This Article argues that these “extra-legislative vetoes” serve functions similar to the President’s Article I veto, only […]

Read More :: View PDF

Extraterritorial Common Law: Does the Common Law Apply Abroad?

The extraterritorial scope of U.S. law is of profound importance to our courts as they confront transnational tort claims stemming from foreign-based human rights violations, acts of terrorism, and other harms occurring all over the globe. Scholars to date have focused on the extraterritorial application of federal statutes, such as the Alien Tort Statute, while […]

Read More :: View PDF