As surveillance technology becomes more sophisticated, the power of private citizens to spy on one another increases. Parents, in particular, may make use of formidable new tools in monitoring their children. For example, with a program covertly installed on a smartphone, parents can track the location of a minor child, install equipment on a car to monitor travel and receive detailed data on driving style, and load spyware onto a home computer to capture social media passwords by monitoring keystrokes and browsing history. Although parents may profess to use this technology only to protect their children, not all instances of surveillance are so noble. In certain cases, when parents wish to gain bargaining leverage over each other, they may lose sight of their children’s best interests. Especially in the context of divorce, children cannot rely on their parents’ benevolent discretion in deploying surveillance technology. . . .